Fee Allocation

Just because one spouse earns more than another does not mean the Court will award attorney fees.  As with everything else in dissolution of marriage actions, whether or not a Court will find lack of parity depends upon the facts in each case.

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Parental Responsibilities

Colorado is currently one of two “un-custody” states in the United States. Instead of deciding “custody” of minor children, Colorado courts decide “parental responsibility” orders that determine how decisions are made for children and what parenting time each parent will have. 

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Property Division

Colorado has a two-step process to divide property in Dissolution of Marriage cases. Before an analysis of how to divide property can be done in Colorado, the first step is to make a determination of exactly “What is property?”

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Child Support

Colorado uses an “income shares” model that determines presumptive child support orders based upon the gross (before tax) incomes of the parties, the number of children, the number of overnights the children have with either parent and the division of responsibility each parent has to pay certain “extraordinary” expenses.

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High Net Worth Cases

Dissolution of marriage cases involving high net worth families are subject to the same rules and statutory limitations are cases with fewer assets.  However, the complexity of high net worth cases makes it critical that a party have legal counsel and supporting experts with sufficient experience to understand and organize the property and related issues.

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Prenuptial Agreements

It is increasingly common for people contemplating marriage to want a prenuptial agreement.  In 2013, Colorado passed a new statue governing prenuptial agreements which became effective on July 1, 2014. This statute codifies what is necessary in the way of financial disclosures and other procedural requirements for a marital agreement to be valid in Colorado.

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